RSV

Infants Aren't the Only Ones Hurt by RSV

Infants Aren't the Only Ones Hurt by RSV

A seasonal respiratory virus that threatens the lives of infants also can have a ripple effect on caregivers, families and workplaces, a new data analysis demonstrates.

Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, typically strikes between October and March with cold-like symptoms that can turn deadly for infants, especially those born prematurely. In fact, RSV bronchiolitis is the leading cause of infant hospitalization in the United States. But a new analysis of data from the SENTINEL 1 study shows the disease also has secondary effects on infants’ caregivers.

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POLL: Parents Lack Awareness of Deadly RSV Virus

Parents of young children lack knowledge about a potentially deadly seasonal virus, a new survey from the National Coalition for Infant Health reveals.

Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, is the leading cause of hospitalization in children under 1 year old. It affects the lungs and respiratory tract and can cause lifelong complications – or death.

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NCfIH Marks RSV Awareness Month With Release of New Fast Facts

October marks the beginning of both the RSV viral season and RSV awareness month. The National Coalition for Infant Health is taking the opportunity to release a new “Fast Facts” educational resource on the virus, its impact, and its danger for infants, especially preemies whose health plans don’t cover preventive treatment.

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New National Coalition for Infant Health Video Introduces the RSV Gap Baby

Most young children encounter what’s known as Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, before age two. It’s a common seasonal virus with flu-like symptoms. But as a new video from the National Coalition for Infant Health explains, premature infants whose health plans don’t cover preventive RSV treatment may suffer – and unnecessarily so.

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