Penn tests new app designed for nurses, mothers of ICU newborns

Last month, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania’s Intensive Care Nursery, which manages breast milk for almost half a million newborn babies in critical care, began testing out a new management system to make the lives of nurses – and new mothers – a lot easier.

Keriton is an app designed by nurses and moms to monitor inventory of breast milk and serve as a communication method between new mothers and the hospital.

Learn more at The Philly Voice.

AAP urges disaster preparation plans for NICUs

Neonatologists and other providers within neonatal intensive care units are critical for the creation of emergency preparedness plans, including the development of appropriate staffing to ensure safe and effective care during a disaster, according to joint recommendations from the AAP Disaster Preparedness Advisory Council and the Committee on Fetus and Newborn.

Read more at Healio. 

Premature babies at higher risk of heart failure

Babies born prematurely run a higher risk of heart failure during childhood and adolescence than those born at full term, says a study.

"We found that the risk of heart failure was higher for individuals born preterm, and inversely correlated with duration of pregnancy, in that the earlier you're born, the greater the risk," said study lead author Hanna Carr, doctoral student at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

Read more at Business Standard

Vaccinating pregnant women year-round may cut flu in babies

Babies born to women vaccinated throughout the year against flu virus are more likely to be healthier and have reduced incidence of influenza, according to a study.

The findings, published in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases, showed that vaccinating pregnant mothers year-round is likely to reduce infant flu virus infection rates by an average of 30 per cent, increase birth weights by 15 per cent and result in babies having less influenza.

Read more at Business Standard. 

Cleveland Clinic Children's NICUs becomes first in region to give families live webcam access

CLEVELAND - A new addition to Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital aims to give parents who have babies born prematurely greater peace of mind.

The Clinic's Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) will get a new web camera system, becoming the first NICUs in the region to get the system. The Clinic will launch the 86 NicView cameras at Hillcrest Hospital and other main campus locations.

Read more at News 5 Cleveland. 

Breastfeeding Plays Key Role in Ensuring Healthy Infant Gut

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding can seed good bacteria in an infant's digestive system, according to research published online May 8 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Grace Aldrovandi, M.D., a professor of pediatrics and chief of infectious diseases at the University of California, Los Angeles, Mattel Children's Hospital, and colleagues assessed 107 breastfeeding mother-infant pairs.

Read more at Physician's Briefing. 

Epilepsy: Another Potential Zika Threat to Babies

MONDAY, April 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Beyond its known links to birth defects and other problems, the Zika virus may also trigger cases of epilepsy in infants, warn experts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Among 48 babies from Brazil with probable congenital Zika infection, "50 percent reportedly had clinical seizures," said Dr. Daniel Pastula, Dr. Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsopp and Rosemarie Kobau.

Read more at Consumer Health Days

 

Black U.S. babies still more likely to die than white infants

(Reuters Health) - Even as infant mortality rates are declining nationwide, there are some U.S. states where black babies are much more likely to die than white infants, a recent study suggests.

Overall, infant mortality rates decreased 13 percent in the U.S. from 2000 to 2013, the study found. By the end of this period, however, the black infant mortality rate was 11.1 deaths for every 1,000 live births, compared with just 5.1 deaths for every 1,000 white newborns. The rate is calculated based on the number of babies who die before their first birthday.

Read more at Reuters Health. 

One in 10 Pregnant Women With Zika in U.S. Have Babies With Birth Defects B

One in 10 pregnant women in the continental United States with a confirmed Zika infection had a baby with brain damage or other serious birth defects, according to the most comprehensive report to date on American pregnancies during the Zika crisis.

The report, published Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also provided more evidence that the risk of birth defects was greater when women were infected in the first trimester of pregnancy. Fifteen percent of women with confirmed Zika infection in the first trimester had babies with birth defects, the report found.

Read more at The New York Times